Showing posts with label ebook download. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ebook download. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel


Although all the plot threads were satisfactorily tied up by the end, for me, the book threw up a number of unanswered questions.



Lane returns to the wealthy Roanoke family home after her mother, Camilla, dies. It's where she spends a summer and where she discovers that beneath the have-it-all façade there lies a seriously dysfunctional family…one she has no desire to be part of. But when her closest ally, her cousin Allegra, goes missing eleven years later, Lane is forced to return.

The book is disturbing and aims to shock…the topic (sexual abuse and incest) is extremely unpleasant…but I became more irritated than shocked by the fact that not one of abusees…and let’s face it, charismatic Grandad ‘has’ just about every female member of the family whatever their ages or generation…reports it or tells anyone else…because Grandad loves them all, they’re all so special. That just didn’t wash with me.

However, despite the chilling and uneasy subject, it is without doubt compelling, riveting and extremely well written. I’ve never read any books by Engel, but her writing is powerful and emotional, and I really enjoyed her style.

Dark, unsettling, a little haunting, sad, twisted, but despite my few niggles, an intense page turner.




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I Know Where She Is by S B Caves


The fact that the book I read before this one was centred around the same crimepaedophilia/sexual abuse/torture(not intentional, incidentally…I had no idea before I started either book!)may suggest that it’s a slightly overdone story line...perhaps.



However, that said, for a debut novel, this is quite an explosive burst onto the literary scene for this author. 

Ten years after Francine’s daughter's (Autumn) abduction, she receives a note saying quite simply: I know where she is. The note’s author, Lena, makes herself known to Francine shortly after and tells her she does indeed know where Autumn is. Clinging on to that last vestige of hope that her daughter is still alive, Francine, armed with vague snippets of information from Lena, does things she’d probably only ever seen in movies to try and find her daughter. But a mother will do anything, anything for her child.

It's all a bit ‘convenient’, there are no real intricacies in the plot, there are some plausibility issues, and the story lacks a bit of padding. It isn’t a long book, but I think its conciseness is at the expense of some finer details. The ending is a little hurried and abrupt. But, but, but...for all that, this was a very well-written, grippingalbeit darkunsettling, disturbingand compelling story and certainly had me glued to the pages from start to finish. 

An excellent start for this author, and I’ll certainly be looking out for his future novels.




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Skin Walk by Melissa Bowersock



It was easy to glide into this book…I thoroughly enjoyed the introductory adventure of Lacey and Sam (Ghost Walk), the oddly matched couple who have joined forces as a PI team. Lacey is an ex LAPD cop and Sam a Navajo medium. 


Their investigation for this second instalment is a little more personal, as Sam is asked to look into the death of his cousin…the circumstances aren't sitting well with Sam’s grandfather. 

But this isn’t a straightforward piecing-together of clues. Witches, curses and shapeshifters are added to the mix…and Lacey and Sam find themselves conducting a dangerous investigation.

This sequel certainly lived up to its predecessor. I enjoyed the development of the couple as they grow more comfortable with each other as a team. They’re chalk and cheese, but are gradually settling into each other’s personalities. I think I’m looking forward to the progress of their relationship as much as the cases they’re commissioned to solve.

Roll on Case no. 3!

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Read The Best of Our Spies by Alex Gerlis

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This is a gripping, WW2, espionage thriller that really captivates. It’s one that starts at a pretty brisk pace and doesn’t once slow down. It gathers momentum and climaxes at breakneck speed. 


It’s an intricate tale of intrigue, bluff and double bluff. It’s a tale of love, deception, courage, tragedy, horror and loss. 



Nathalie Mercier, a young nurse, is sent to France by British Intelligence to work with the French Resistance shortly before D-Day. She leaves behind a new husband, Owen, also working closely with the Royal Navy Intelligence, who wonders if they will ever see each other again. But the seemingly naïve, industrious and dedicated Owen has been underestimated by his superiors, and he discovers a web of deceit and lies from people he trusted and loved. He has to find his wife, at all costs. 

Gerlis is master storyteller. The characters are well defined and totally credible, and you care deeply about those you are intended to. The facts of the Second World War period have been meticulously researched, and the horrors of that dreadful time woven into the story with skill, to produce an atmospheric and riveting novel.

Whilst I would dearly love to accredit a five-star rating to this book, Gerlis' editing is as unremarkable as his skill as a storyteller is irrefutable. There are countless errors (words missing, spelling, punctuation and some bad grammatical errors), but it’s a testament to the quality of the story and writing (for the most part) that I can still attribute a healthy four stars. The book appears to be well accepted, so I fear future professional editing may well be bypassed. I’ll just hope.

This was an unexpected reading pleasure. Historical novels, though not excluded from my reading, are less favoured, but this certainly grabbed my attention, and I had no option but to neglect my daily chores and use matchsticks to prop my eyes open in the small hours of the morning. The end had to be reached as quickly as possible! Highly recommended.



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Complicit by Gillian E. Hamer Epub

This was a compelling story that kept my nose firmly between the pages…I did actually guess ‘whodunnit’ before the revelation, but it didn’t mar my enjoyment at all, although I felt ten chapters dedicated to a war some two millennia earlier were rather boring and unnecessary. The relevance of the war to the plot could have been woven into the story in other ways.

Descendants of the Druids involved in that war hold secrets that one person wants to know…badly. So badly, in fact, that serial killings become the urgent focus of three detectives. A killer is at large who will stop at nothing to unearth these very closely guarded secrets.

It was a surprise to me to discover that this book is actually the third in a series, so I was particularly impressed how well it stood alone. The characters and plot are well developed (perhaps just a tad muddled towards the end). I also had to suspend disbelief…Druids might have had ‘seers’ in their midst in 60 AD…but in the twenty-first century? I don’t think so.

For all that, it was a gripping book and deserves a five-star rating, but sadly, the editing wasn’t up to scratch. Grammatical errors, some odd phrases verging on Malapropisms and a bunch of punctuation faux pas (too much reliance on software editing) means I have to knock a star off.

Notwithstanding, I like this author and will certainly hunt out more of her books.





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The Marriage Pact by Michelle Richmond


A psychological suspense thriller this certainly is. The plot is ridiculously implausible, but okay, it’s fiction, slack must be cut, but I found myself wrestling with its increasing implausibility as it went on.


Jake and Alice are very much in love, and when they marry they're given the most unusual wedding present: membership to a club which ensures their marriage will be long and strong. Seems like a bit of fun, so why not? And they sign on the dotted line. Little do they know, however, that they're signing themselves into a living nightmare.

The club….’The Pact’…is based on a manual of encyclopaedic proportions listing the dos and donts of marriage. That right there started my cynical clock ticking…some ridiculous rules and regulations. Failure to adhere result in barbaric…and disturbing…punishment. So why don’t Jake and Alice leave, you may ask? One doesn’t. One does not leave The Pact.

It was very well written…in a style that ensured gripping suspense. There were definitely a few matchstick moments late at night as I eagerly turned the pages, and despite having to suspend disbelief, this isn't far off being a first-rate thriller, but the ending was a let-down. I was niggled by the present-tense narrative of the story; it just didn’t work, and that was endorsed by the inconclusive ending.

Can I recommend it? Despite my misgivings, yes, I think I can. It’s taut, it’s tense and I have to say it’s addictive. Try it and tell me what you think!






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Class Action by Chris James

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This is my second rendezvous with this author, my first with The Second Internet Cafe - Part 1 The Dimension Researcher. My opinion of him then was that he's an excellent and intelligent writer, one who can make you turn pages faster than you ever thought possible. Class Action was, in fact, his debut novel and my goodness, he certainly knew how to make an inaugural splash.


The story is set in a Warsaw courtroom. A man is in prison for the murder of a young woman, but it falls upon a young Polish litigator, Alex Moreyl, to prove that he committed the murder after seeing a violent film: that a powerful message during the film was relayed to the culprit, telling him to commit the crime. The proof? Advanced technology that enables every thought that’s ever entered a person’s head to be extracted and read. With convincing evidence from an expert in the field, the case looks as if it will be done and dusted in no time. But a catastrophic event throws Alex into a dangerous, ruthless, political battlefield between powerful entities, one in which he almost loses his life and those of his wife and family are in grave danger.

This is a futuristic thriller, brilliantly written. It’s original and clever; clever, because although the process of compulsory brain scanning is an almost unthinkable eventuality, the events of the political arena and dangers and threats of terrorism, however, are not so far removed from the present day. Technology, it seems, may advance in leaps and bounds, but nothing changes in politics or in the fight for supremacy between major states. This is a book that takes a glimpse into the future but touches base with present-day reality.

Action, intrigue, excitement, thrills, complexity, vision. This book has all those things.

Oh, and authorial genius.






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The Fault in our Stars by John Green

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I had no idea this existed until I realised there was a movie with the same title. I have a golden rule of never watching a movie until I’ve read the book, so decided to get that out of the way. With a host of good reviews on Amazon, I really wanted to see for myself if it lived up to its popularity.



I’m sure it’s fairly widely known that the story features two terminally ill teenagers (Hazel and Augustus), who meet at a cancer support group. It’s an instant attraction, both mental and physical, and the encounter impacts their (short) lives.

Despite the fact that it’s a little hard to believe the dialogue is coming out of the mouths of sixteen/seventeen-year-olds, the rather excessive use of Capitalized Phrases To Make a Point, and the plot stretching the imagination just a little too far, I really loved this book.

It’s easy to get into and easy to love the characters without feeling pity for them. It’s a love story, sprinkled with deep sadness and poignancy, but the writing is razor-sharp, witty, humorous, and engaging. I found it hard to put down, hard to accept that it had finished (note to self: read more John Green!) and can’t wait to see the movie.


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Fleischerhaus by Melissa Bowersock

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This was a superb little package. I really enjoyed it.

Julia Martin decides a long holiday in Europe, visiting her best friends in Germany, will be just the ticket to help her get over her divorce after her cheating husband’s infidelity. The Bavarian chocolate-box countryside is just what she needs. One afternoon, when out cycling with her friend, they come across a concentration camp. Insignificant in terms of notoriety, but just as significant in terms of the well-known atrocities that took place in such camps. A tour round the museum-converted camp turns out to be a shocking experience for Julia. Horrifyingly, she realises that, in a past life, she was murdered there as a young girl. With the help of her good friends and a very handsome doctor, she tries to unravel the mystery of who murdered her. As the facts slowly reveal themselves, the truth is quite shocking.

I don’t believe in the concept that we all have a past-life. As far as I’m concerned, we’re the product of an egg and a sperm, end of. This didn’t make a scrap of difference to my enjoyment of this book, however. It’s a story well told with a balanced mix of elements: the developing relationship between Julia and Theo, the doctor, was tender and endearing and provided a mellow contrast to the horrors of the Holocaust. There are also some surprises: in Julia’s love life and in the outcome of the research into the events of her past life.

There’s passion and emotion in Melissa’s writing. You can feel it both in the romantic part of the book and in the portrayal of events in a war which will never be forgotten.  Talent, indeed.

Highly recommended.

See also:

Stone's Ghost




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Bad Spirits by DV Berkom

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I don’t think Berkom’s books are good for me. They’re way too heart-pounding and action-packed: there’s no sitting back and relaxing while you read her books. It’s edge-of-your-seat, heart-in-your-mouth writing.


Spunky, no-nonsense, alpha-female protagonists are definitely Berkom’s speciality. And Kate Jones certainly fits the description to a T. She’s on the run from not one, but two, ruthless and unscrupulous drug barons. She’s got their money; they want her…preferably dead. Every corner she turns, hoping she’s one step further away from them and one step nearer safety, provides another nail-biting situation from which she has to extricate herself.

Captivating and attention-grabbing from the start, this short story is a mouth-watering appetiser to the following books in this thriller series, which I’ll most certainly be reading. Once I’ve caught my breath, of course.






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Kiss of Night by K. S. Brooks

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Kathrin Night is a special agent. Or rather…she was. She is reluctantly…and a little resentfully…forced to relinquish her special-agent duties by an injury. But a gutsy, no-nonsense, rather complex character isn’t the type of person to settle easily into a more relaxed lifestyle. With no choice in the matter, she is landed with a Russian bodyguard. A rather handsome, hunky, chunky, hockey-playing one, at that. How is he going to help her adapt to her new life?

I devoured this book rather quickly. It’s short, yes, but it’s so, so easy to get sucked into Kathrin’s life. It was my first encounter with her, and I like her a lot. The book is a sort of prequel and scene-setter for Night Undone, which follows. We learn how she acquired her injury, how she became a special agent, why she had to give it up and all neatly done in just over a hundred and twenty pages. Brooks writes very engagingly with wit and humour, and it was with no difficulty at all that I rushed eagerly over to Night Undone. I wasn’t going to let her go easily.

An excellent and compelling read.


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Shadows of Morrow by A. C. Haury

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Shadows of Morrow by A. C. Haury



This is one of those books that kept making me say out loud, ‘What a shame’. It ticked so many boxes: good plot, check; compelling, check; fast-paced, check; gripping, check. But for every checked box, there was one to uncheck.

It’s an intriguing story: Catherine Morrow is found dead, in suspicious circumstances, hours after giving birth to her fifth child, Tristan. But this fact is kept from Tristan, who believes her mother left her family. When she discovers the truth, some fifteen years later, she argues with her father. Hours later, she too, goes missing. And so, family secrets are uncovered and revealed, and the family learns of the dangerous obsessions of one disturbed former school friend, one who has never let Catherine or her family out of his grasp.


This is a plot with plenty of meat and bones on it. And it does work. I really found myself not being able to put the book down.

But…sadly, it was seriously let down by lack of, or no, editing. I’m almost convinced this book started life in the present tense, but the author then changed her mind and decided to change to past tense. Unfortunately, the conversion wasn’t thorough enough and there’s a strange and incorrect mix mid-sentence. There’s no end of grammatical errors and spelling mistakes, one or two minor consistencies, and the formatting is erratic with font-size inconsistencies. Nor am I so sure that one small odd chapter in first person pov of a dead person works. This just clouds the virtues of this book, which really saddens me. It could so easily find itself in the five-star-review hall. Everything that’s wrong with this book could be effortlessly fixed, and what I’d like to see in the author’s acknowledgements, alongside her grateful thanks to her family and friends, is a nod of appreciation in the direction of a good editor.

I can’t deny I enjoyed this book. I really did, and I so regret not being able to award it five stars. Would I recommend it? Yes, but wait until the author has fed it through a vigorous editing process.






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Uncertainty Principles by Krista Tibbs

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Uncertainty Principles by Krista Tibbs

This was an original and surprisingly compelling story. Surprisingly to me, that is—the scientific element in the story had me a little worried. The sciences were not my strongest, or even favourite, subject at school, so I thought most of it would go over my head. It didn’t, and as a result I was able to enjoy a very unusual novel.

Five students team up for a science project, one they need to make a success of, as they want to secure their graduation marks. And so, they find a way to measure atmospheric energy to enable them to estimate the probability of the occurrence of events that are almost certain to be catastrophic. A life-changing incident involving one of the group halts the project. Four members of the team re-assemble nine years later, their memories very fresh still from the abrupt end to their undergraduate project. Each of them is older not just in years, but in wisdom, outlook and responsibility, the inexperience of their youth nine years earlier somewhat dissipated. Their regrouping, it seems, though strained, proves to be vital...if not life-saving.
Uncertainty Principles by Krista Tibbs
I have to say that it did take me a while to work out to whom the first person POV belonged, and I wasn’t always sure when I was in the undergraduate time or the nine-year-later time. However, eventually, everything does fall into place very methodically.

 I enjoyed this book. The five students couldn’t be more unalike, but they’re cleverly juxtapositioned, a bit like an outfit with clashing colours that works well as a whole, and I loved that I really had no idea how this story would roll out. Add to that, intelligent and articulate writing AND—hoorah!!!—excellent editing, and you’ve got a different and top-quality read.


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Round Robin by Joseph Flynn AudioBook


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Delightful book. Thoroughly enjoyed it. This is a romance, but not your full-on, gushy, hearts-and-flowers-type romance. It’s meaty, solid and robust. And how refreshing not to have a perfect female protagonist with gorgeous long blond/brunette/red hair, perfect eyes, bust measurement and legs up to her armpits. Equally non-perfect is the male protagonist: again, not the sort of hunk you’ve come to expect. Hunky, though, in quite a different way…

Robin is a bitter, overweight, mouthy woman with bad man-history, who works in a deli delivering as good as she gets, free of charge, along with the sandwiches she serves. She lives alone in a two-storey apartment, the ground floor of which she’s transformed into an indoor ‘park’. Somewhere to sit and reflect and forget. But her ambition to buy the deli from its soon-to-retire owner is becoming financially prohibitive, as it leaves her little cash for money for repairs to her haven. She reluctantly agrees to a live-in handyman: he does the d-i-y in return for lodgings. Enter Manfred. A German ex-powerlifter who’s been in prison for spying.

Two people both with ‘baggage’, both with demons. But how differently they each deal with it.

This was very well written (albeit a little rough around the edges editorially). There’s some cracking dialogue, some superb characters, all in a neat well-structured plot. Not a lot of male romance authors around, as far as I know, and I don’t think I’ve read many. But this author certainly nailed it.

A wonderful read.


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Branded For Murder by Dick C. Waters

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Branded For Murder by Dick C. Waters


I so, so wanted to love this book. It promised to satisfy my favourite genre requirements as a crime/thriller/suspense/mystery-type book.

 Set in the sixties, while Scott Tucker is studying at Harvard, his cousin, Jackie, falls victim to a serial killer known as The New England Strangler. Scott manages to get himself on the police team investigating the murders…his way of finding justice for his much-loved cousin. Between studies and crime-busting, he manages to fall in lust with Lisa Anderson, and both come to the conclusion that their future together is pretty much set in stone: they’re made for each other, it seems. A certain strangler, however, has other plans…
In essence, a great plot, intensified by red herrings and revenge. In essence, a good cast of characters—the roll-out is well balanced and most of the personae credible. 

Branded For Murder by Dick C. Waters

But sadly, that’s where the pros end: at the ‘essence’. There were a number of very annoying features: the characters’ incessant habit of referring to each other by name in dialogue exchanges (sometimes three times in a paragraph) was infuriating and unnecessary; the tenses were in a complete mess (was this meant to be in the present or in the past?); apart from the mention of Kennedy’s assassination, there were very few references to the sixties’ era; the dialogue was wooden, stilted and unnatural; I found it hard to believe an undergraduate could so easily be admitted onto a high-profile investigative team, totally unvetted (and manage to make them look utterly stupid); and…editing? Was there any? At least five instances of incorrect its/it’s and inconsistent spellings suggest not.

I really, really struggled to finish this book. Although the latter twenty-five percent suddenly picked up a pace, I almost gave up at ninety-five percent (unheard of for me). I realised I didn’t care one iota for the characters. That said, with Scott Tucker books two, three and four sitting on my Kindle, I might just have to find out what happens to Scott and Lisa, whether he graduates, and where his future in law enforcement lies.

Difficult to recommend this, unfortunately.


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A Very English Affair by Faith Mortimer ebook epub download

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A Very English Affair by Faith Mortimer


Summertime, for some reason, seems to be a great time for romances…reading them, that is…and one to include has to be A Very English Affair. Faith has a few very enjoyable romances tucked under her belt, and this one is no exception.


Danielle, in her mid-thirties, seems to have done well: a successful travel agency and owns her own home. Then, the icing on the cake comes in the form of handsome Christian, who sweeps her off her feet and a passionate love affair leads to an undying love for each other they know will last forever. How long, though, is forever?

A Very English Affair by Faith Mortimer


A bit of a tearjerker, this one, but without being sloppy, cliched or oversentimental. As always, the story is perfectly balanced, and the characters likeable, credible and well portrayed. You’re always in good hands with Faith and you know what you’re going to get, whether it’s a romance or one of Diana Rivers’ adventures: a good, clean, structured plot with characters you can identify with, written with sincerity and feeling.
We’ve had A Very French Affair, now an English one…where next, I wonder…Italy, Spain?


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The One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

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The One Plus One by Jojo Moyes


I’m a good many books away from having read a traditionally published book, so I thought I would dip in, just to see if all those harsh critics of self-published books had any basis for their unfavourable comments. Well, on the basis of this book…they haven’t.

The One Plus One features Jess, a single mum struggling to support two children after the departure of their father: a mum who wants to do the right thing whatever the circumstances and who wants instil the same ethic in her children. Tanzie is a mathematical child prodigy, and Nicky is taunted by neighbourhood bullies. They're both ‘different’ in their own way, and Jess wants to do her best for both, but a financially unsupportive ex-husband makes life very difficult.

The One Plus One by Jojo Moyes

Ed Nicholls is a computer software genius, financially secure with a glowing future—glowing until an error of judgement in some pillow talk rocks his world. Jess and her business partner, Nathalie, clean his house, and her relationship with him is strictly professional, but as it happens, a great deal is about to changefor him and for her.

I really did enjoy this. It was a very appealing story with some engaging characters, great dialogue and a drooling dog you just had to adore. It was very easy to climb right inside the story and feel you were part of it all. Jojo is obviously very good at her craft. However, I think she’s spent too much time in the US…whilst the writing is distinctly British, a few very American phrases have crept in, and they stood out like a sore thumb; they just weren’t necessary. I also had to raise my eyebrows at the speed at which a character was attended to in A&E. You don’t just drop in and get treated without waiting for at least two to four hours, I’m afraid.

What I was surprised…and irritated…by was the standard of editing. One of the main criticisms of the anti-indie community is just that: poor editing. The editor of this book had no idea of comma usage, there was a time and tense discrepancy and annoying font changes…I had to keep changing the font size of my Kindle. So I’m disappointed that a big publisher and this author simply don’t care about standards or their readers. As long as they’re skipping all the way to the bank with their £££s, that’s enough, it seems.

I do recommend this book, but I have read better-edited self-published books.






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Monday, November 13, 2017

Hot Pursuit by Susanne O'Leary

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A third ‘Hottie’ by Susanne. (Hot Property, Hot Gossip). And it is a hottie! This time, we’re in the company of Rita, who made an appearance in Hot Gossip.


Lovelorn thirty-something Rita grabs an opportunity to start a new life in Dublin, working for a topnotch hairdressing salon. New life, new job, new friends: will this help her forget the object of her unrequited love? Will it help her forget the memory of a mistake she made as a naive sixteen-year-old?  A mistake she feels compelled to right if she is enjoy her new future.  She tries her best with the help of the dishy Ricardo, her hairdressing co-worker and Josh, the intrepid war correspondent. One is her lover, the other her best friend. But has she got them the right way round?

Once again, Susanne hits the spot with this romance. Colourful, interesting and funny characters against the backdrop of the gorgeous Irish countryside are the perfect ingredients for this story. It’s well balanced, the characters natural, the dialogue fluid and fun, and it’s all presented in Susanne’s usual, mellow, warm style.

Easy to read, easy to enjoy and very easy to recommend! Will we be Hotting up again, I wonder?


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Hot Gossip by Susanne O'Leary

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Hot Gossip is the sequel to Hot Property. Susanne has done an outstanding job of enabling it to stand alone, with well-thought-out references to its prequel.

Also set in the beautiful Irish countryside, Hot Gossip features Janine Marchand, a rather enigmatic (and charismatic) young and beautiful Frenchwoman, with an intriguing and colourful past. She seeks to escape the more unsavoury aspects of that past in a small, quaint village in Ireland, backdropped by austere and stunning landscape. Her endeavours to stay incognito are not helped by two men in the village, who are captivated by her, and the daughter of one of them, twelve-year-old Nelia, whose impressionability and somewhat hasty immature actions lead to near tragedy.

The story weaves expertly back and forth from a heady time in Egypt, back to the sleepy Irish village, the times and events a sharp contrast to each other. As with Hot Property, it’s obvious the fondness O’Leary has for her adopted Ireland: she sells it better than any Lonely Planet guide!

Janine, Nelia, Jake (the significant other from her time in Egypt), and Mick (Nelia’s father) are all strong, know-their-own-minds characters. Makes for some delightful ‘fireworks’, and it’s wonderful to see Polish Beata and her big-bear husband, Boris, (from Hot Property) making a reappearance.

Wonderfully written, as always by this author, this is a ‘fine romance’.


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Alchemy by Mike Wood

ALCHEMY BY MIKE WOOD

Alchemy by Mike Wood


The author of this book states in his end 'Credits' that he 'doesn’t honestly like writing'. And yet, he persisted for 346 very long, tedious pages it seems. He also pays tribute to his editor's keen eye for detail. Really? Hmm...

‘I had just went…’

‘Why don’t you where your shoes?’

‘Must of called in sick’

‘By dinner time, I had made up my mind to just peddle over there…’

‘I might get a peak at the upstairs’


Aaargh!

…to quote just a few from the appallingly long list. There were missing quotation marks, bad grammar, characters starting nearly every sentence with ‘well’, inconsistent spellings. And...plurals are not formed with an apostrophe and an ‘s’. As for punctuation…not quite a ‘Let’s eat Grandma’ example but ‘Be sure to come right in Cammie’ wasn’t far off.

If a badly edited book really annoys you, don’t read any further. This book isn’t for you.

Editing aside, this book wasn’t for me simply because it was mind-numbingly boring. Al Newman is a fifteen-year-old teen, whose father left the family home one day and never returned. Refusing to believe he simply walked away, Al sets out to explore theories of abduction. He is helped by Cammie, staying in the area with her father for the summer period. Cammie is a beautiful young girl for whom Al falls hook, line and sinker.

This doesn’t actually get remotely interesting until Al finally learns the truth of his father's disappearance, which is over halfway through. The book could easily have been a hundred pages shorter. The first half overdoes the teenage angst thing while trying to hold your attention with the explanation of Newman Senior’s vanishing act (which I guessed early on).

Despite the fact that this practically put me to sleep every night, I stuck it out to the end. I liked Al. I liked his mother.  Although the writing isn’t prize-winning stuff, there’s a gentle humour and wit throughout. 
I got the feeling that a lot of the author was in Al...and Wood seems like a nice chap. So it does pain me to say that, regrettably, I can't recommend this.  I would recommend, however, an editorial overhaul. 
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