Showing posts with label Teen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Teen. Show all posts

Monday, November 13, 2017

Alchemy by Mike Wood

ALCHEMY BY MIKE WOOD

Alchemy by Mike Wood


The author of this book states in his end 'Credits' that he 'doesn’t honestly like writing'. And yet, he persisted for 346 very long, tedious pages it seems. He also pays tribute to his editor's keen eye for detail. Really? Hmm...

‘I had just went…’

‘Why don’t you where your shoes?’

‘Must of called in sick’

‘By dinner time, I had made up my mind to just peddle over there…’

‘I might get a peak at the upstairs’


Aaargh!

…to quote just a few from the appallingly long list. There were missing quotation marks, bad grammar, characters starting nearly every sentence with ‘well’, inconsistent spellings. And...plurals are not formed with an apostrophe and an ‘s’. As for punctuation…not quite a ‘Let’s eat Grandma’ example but ‘Be sure to come right in Cammie’ wasn’t far off.

If a badly edited book really annoys you, don’t read any further. This book isn’t for you.

Editing aside, this book wasn’t for me simply because it was mind-numbingly boring. Al Newman is a fifteen-year-old teen, whose father left the family home one day and never returned. Refusing to believe he simply walked away, Al sets out to explore theories of abduction. He is helped by Cammie, staying in the area with her father for the summer period. Cammie is a beautiful young girl for whom Al falls hook, line and sinker.

This doesn’t actually get remotely interesting until Al finally learns the truth of his father's disappearance, which is over halfway through. The book could easily have been a hundred pages shorter. The first half overdoes the teenage angst thing while trying to hold your attention with the explanation of Newman Senior’s vanishing act (which I guessed early on).

Despite the fact that this practically put me to sleep every night, I stuck it out to the end. I liked Al. I liked his mother.  Although the writing isn’t prize-winning stuff, there’s a gentle humour and wit throughout. 
I got the feeling that a lot of the author was in Al...and Wood seems like a nice chap. So it does pain me to say that, regrettably, I can't recommend this.  I would recommend, however, an editorial overhaul. 
TAG:
- Alchemy by Mike Wood
- Alchemy by Mike Wood
- Alchemy by Mike Wood
- Alchemy by Mike Wood
Read more

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Daedalian Muse by Jamie Crothall Download




Daedalian Muse by Jamie Crothall

This was rather quirky and a lot of fun. 

Tempus Fugit is, in his own words, “an independent agent in the investigation of scientific anomalies” and believes ghosts and goblins have no place in our “ever-so-tangible world, as all have valid and reasonable explanations.”

Tempus is called in to investigate some rather perplexing occurrences in the ruins of a building in a rural English village. Preferring to use his scientific logic to explain events, Tempus does his best to dispel the conception that the ruins are haunted. He firmly believes the truth is often cast aside, because fantasy is so much more attractive. 

However, even an expert of his calibre, can find himself everso slightly out of his depth…

Tempus is almost a victim of his name: time has passed him by, and he hasn’t quite caught up with modern day morals or technology. He really is a bit of an oddball, but he finds an unlikely ally in a teenager, wise beyond her years, who assists him with his strange assignment. There are some humorous moments provided by his encounter with a young lady with a voracious sexual appetite and his rather quaint interpretation of ‘homosexual’.

This doesn’t take long to read. There’s a lovely mix of characters, a dollop of eccentricity, and the author has an intelligent style of writing that doesn’t pretend to be supercilious or condescending.

Great fun.


Daedalian Muse by Jamie Crothall


Read more

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Johnny Roberts and the Guardians of the Sun by Andrew Noble


Johnny Roberts and the Guardians of the Sun by Andrew Noble

This is quite a speedy read, not just because it’s not that long a book, but because it’s a rather compelling page-turner leaving you no option but to read swiftly to the end!

Johnny Roberts is a thirteen-year-old who lives in Johannesburg with an alcoholic and abusive father. A father-and-son outing ends dramatically with a revelation that stuns Johnny. It’s a revelation that impels him to flee from any further abuse from a violent parent. With the help of some unusual transport, Johnny flees good and proper…to South America, no less, where he finds a lost tribe, who treats him like a god…literally. While the CIA are enlisted to trace the vanished young teenager, Johnny finds himself as the only person able to help his newfound tribal friends, suddenly under threat of attack from a power-crazed drug lord. The only thing that can help him is his rather extraordinary transport…

Johnny Roberts and the Guardians of the Sun by Andrew Noble

I’m not an avid sci-fi reader: I’m not very good a suspending my disbelief. But this story moved along at a decent pace, the villains were well and truly villainous, Johnny was exceptionally likeable, and there was a nice little substory going on with the two members of the CIA, who are doing their utmost to find the missing teenager. Although the story ends with a climax, there’s just a hint that there could be more to come.

An enjoyable teen sci-fi.


Read more